Sunday, April 12, 2015

Daredevil ( Netflix )

This series has been on my radar since last year, and I am now digesting it at a leisurely pace.

3 episodes in, I'm still reserving judgment. It's garnered an average rating of 9.4/10 on, but I may wait till I finish the entire season before giving my verdict.

I'm no fan of comic book heroes ( my reading list leans more towards Archie, Calvin & Hobbes, The Far Side, Sherman's Lagoon, Tintin and Asterix ). Daredevil can't quite compare with the likes of Superman, Batman and Iron Man, but I was very excited after seeing the first trailer some time back - dark, bloody, foreboding.

I'm a huge fan of dark things. I mean, Dexter is my favourite TV series, and the character ( TV and books ) is my personal hero. My mind's wired that way. :)

Early impressions of Daredevil are a little mixed so far, but I give high marks to the casting choices, especially British actor Charlie Cox in the leading role. I mostly recognize him from a small part in Stardust and more recently, as a kind-hearted church choirmaster in The Theory Of Everything. After seeing him play such sweetly benign good guys, it was shocking to learn he'd be playing Daredevil. Even more shocking to see what he's capable of through the stylishly executed trailer.

I think he's doing a terrific job, and prefer him to Ben Affleck's version in the 2003 movie ( back when most superhero flicks were light-hearted and campy ). Cox has a boyish, almost angelic, face, projects a strong screen presence, and possesses just the right degree of gravitas without coming across as stiff or pretentious. According to Empire magazine, he went through a rigorous training programme to get that ripped physique - which I appreciate, thank you! - though I can't always tell if it's really him in those complicated fight scenes ( and there're lots of them ).

What I enjoy most, however, is his voice - deep, honey-smooth, oddly reassuring and menacing at the same time, depending on the situation. The same speech pattern can comfort a damsel or child in distress yet strike fear into the hearts of hard-core criminals. Reminder to self to pay more attention to the inflections used in future episodes, so I can figure out why the effects are so drastically different!

The other inspired casting choice is Vincent D'Onofrio, whose career I've followed for many years, since his days on Law & Order: Criminal Intent. I'm a huge fan of his work on that series, and was endlessly delighted by his entertaining portrayal of a super-intelligent NYPD detective with OCD tendencies and a scary ability to see through any facade.
He also has 2 of the most beautiful hands I've ever seen. :)

D'Onofrio doesn't make an appearance in Daredevil until the last 5 minutes of episode 3, just before the suspense threatens to overwhelm you. Rest assured that the buildup doesn't fall flat. D'Onofrio has a large, imposing frame, and emanates evil effortlessly. Even as an NYPD detective on Law & Order, he played a good guy but always made me edgy because he seemed to have a dark side which he kept hidden, but which you could sense if you looked closely enough.

Now that he's playing a real villain - so terrifying that a snitch violently commits suicide after revealing his identity to Daredevil - I can only imagine what twisted fun is in store.
( I repeat, my mind's wired that way. :))

Writing-wise, it doesn't come close to the exceptional standard of House Of Cards ( another Netflix product ). Episode 2 was especially draggy, featuring Daredevil's encounter with an ER nurse who treats his wounds ( I would've preferred an ER doctor, for selfish reasons haha ). The dialogue is clumsy and the acting forced. Could be the director's fault since episode 3 fares much better.

I'm hopeful that subsequent installments will improve. In the meantime, Cox and D'Onofrio are more than sufficient to keep me invested.

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